AAUP-WILMINGTON COLLEGE, OHIO


AAUP
Wilmington College of Ohio

Page first posted 10.9.05. Last modified 10.27.2013.

Links for Fall 2013

Why do Wilmington faculty deserve a substantial, structural pay raise?

The faculty are appreciative that the current administration has abjured the previous administration's annual accounting sham of claiming a "budget crisis" that always attacked the academic program while leaving administrative spending, not merely intact, but increasing. We are also appreciative of receiving a cost-of-living raise for the first time since 2006.

That said, however, financial priorities remain an uppermost concern. In spite of the raise, we remain the lowest-paid faculty in Ohio for the latest reported year in the AAUP Academe survey, once full/associate/assistant are lumped together. We have fallen so far behind that even if we get cost-of-living increase every year from now on, we will never regain comparable pay against other colleges.

It seems necessary, at this point, to emphasize two facts:

  • One, Wilmington College spends twice as much on student services as the average of other comparable private Ohio colleges and universities the last time we reviewed IPEDs (see IPEDs Multi-Comparison below, page 3, figure 4), and
  • Two, the Board of Trustees is legally obligated, by way of their by-laws, to amelioriate the faculty-pay shortfall.
  • The reason for this is simple. The Board's by-laws state, very clearly, that the Board is obligated to oversee faculty pay with an eye toward two factors:

    This requirement does not impose on the Board a necessity for reviewing adminstrative or staff pay. Only faculty pay is so mandated. It also does not allow of claims of alleged financial exigency; nor, of the claim that "we'd like to give everyone a raise, but can't afford to;" nor does it allow a claim that raises for faculty only, or to install comparable differentiation by rank, are "elitist" or somehow incompatible with someone's claimed interpretation of "Quaker values." (It should also be noted that the alleged 60K average pay of a WC full professor is a full 20% higher than the actual pay of some individual full professors, who are--in fact--paid little better than assistant professors at Heidelberg.)

    The Board's by-laws are unambiguous and unqualified: the College is obligated both to pay going wages to the faculty, and to pay faculty of higher ranks at a level which compares to such distinction at comparable institutions.

    The faculty have the right not only to ask, but to insist that this obligation be honored, as it has not been for many years now.

    On the matter of administrative spending, the time is long overdue for the college to conduct the Noelle-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory survey. The college's last Strategic Plan intoned that we were to survey students as to their satisfaction with administrative offices, and the results to be published, in order to improve service. In fact, nothing in that direction was done, and my (Dr. McNelis's) own proposal that it be done was shunted to the Student Life committee in 2007, where it has rested quietly ever since. I have repeated this proposal several times in the last couple of years, to the same non-result as formerly.

    Links for Spring 2012

    The general organization of this page is chronological, with new items added at the top as they come along. However, since budgetary concerns are near or at the top of faculty's list, the budget section will be kept at the top for ease of reference.

    Budgets Vs. Financial Statements:

    The following quote is from Academe's article (November-December, 2011, pp. 8-9) on the AAUP chapter at Stetson U in Florida--like ours, an advocacy chapter at a private university. It may sound familiar:

    "Year after year, the administration says, "Once our revenue reaches this level, we'll be able to spend it on research and merit scholarships and professional development and faculty compensation, but we have to spend money over here on landscaping, athletics, dining facilities, before we can pay you." And every cycle ends the same way: we've spent the money, we've seen the results, we're ready to get paid--oh, wait, there's another financial disaster. We can't break that cycle without understanding the institution's finances and pressing to be included in financial decisions." --Joel Davis, Stetson U.

    Ipeds Multi-Comparison Report for Wilmington College, up to our reporting for tax year 2009; this report was run in May 2011. The comparison group of colleges and universities is listed at the beginning; it includes (I think) all Ohio private colleges except for the highest-end/least comparable, such as Case Western.

    "Understanding University And College Financial Statements", from Rudy Fichtenbaum, Economics, Wright State University

    "Most often, faculty are misled by looking only at a University's budget. A budget is just a financial plan. However, institutions have no legal obligation to spend money in accordance with their budget. For example, a budget may show that money has been allocated for a certain number of faculty positions. However, administrations routinely leave faculty positions vacant and are thus able to spend the money that has been budgeted for faculty positions for other purposes. To get a true picture of a University's finances one must look at the actual financial statements, which represent the actual revenues and expenditures of the university. Evaluating a University's finances by looking at its budget would be the equivalent of evaluating the performance of a for-profit company by looking at its business plan."

    --Rudy Fichtenbaum, Economics, Wright State

    Rudy's Analysis of the Financial Statements of Fairfield University provides a model for financial transparency and accountability at a private college like our own.

    The Faculty Needs to Know About the Budget--that is, the actual spending documented in the financial statements:

    A good link on engaging faculty in the budget from Indiana State U, including a well-phrased summary of why the budget is, in fact, faculty's business as well as that of the administration.

    "The Faculty and the Budget" (Academe, March-April 2001)

    Model Handbook Policies on Budgetary Matters:

    Faculty Handbook Policies, Budget Committees, and Budget Principles (AAUP.org)

    AAUP at LSU Addresses Budget Cuts and Power Grabs:

    "Taking a Stand" (letter dated 3.16.2009)

    NC State policy on principles of budget cutting:

    NC Policy approved 2.1.2006

    September 13, 2009: How to Read IRS form 990:

    (charity's tax return form): http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/tutorials/demystify/

              
    Geoffrey Woolf, Chief Negotiator (on the left in the left image)

    10.8.2011: Rudy Fichtenbaum's guide to understanding college financial statements is now linked under "Budgets Vs. Financial Statements," above.

    September 28, 2011: PAUL HAS ANNOUNCED THE STRIKE WILL LAST FOR ONE WEEK, ENDING AS OF FRIDAY MORNING. WC BRANCH FACULTY MOVED OUR CLASSES TO OUR BLUE ASH LOCATION, SO AS NOT TO CROSS THE PICKET LINE. WILMINGTON'S SUPPORT HAS BEEN NOTED BY CINCI STATE AAUP ON THEIR WEBPAGE HERE: http://www.cinstateaaup.org/2011/WilmingtonCollegeSupport.pdf

    The Cinci State faculty welcome any visitors to join them on the picket line next week starting 7 a.m. Monday.

    A message to Wilmington faculty from Cinci State faculty:

    Dr. McNelis,

    The Cincinnati State AAUP is extremely grateful to the Wilmington AAUP for your support in our job action.

    It's a difficult time for everyone here, and knowing that our colleagues are behind us makes all the difference in the world...

    Profuse thanks,
    Geoffrey Woolf
    Chief Negotiator, Contract Compliance Officer
    Cincinnati State AAUP

    AAUP National on the strike: http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/newsroom/2011+Web+Highlights/CSstrike.htm

    Local TV news, 9/28: students storm president's office: http://www.wcpo.com/dpp/news/region_central_cincinnati/clifton/students-march-on-president%27s-office Local TV news. 9/23: http://www.wcpo.com/dpp/news/region_central_cincinnati/clifton/Cincinnati-State-strike-planned-for-one-week

    The Cinci State AAUP website, linked below, will provide updates.

    From AAUP President Cary Nelson: What an AAUP chapter can do for your college

    President Nelson questions how we are supposed to assess, for example, teaching about the Holocaust? http://chronicle.com/article/Keep-Your-Hands-Off-the/128804/

    New Links for Fall 2010 Below: Task Forces, Online Teaching, and Budgets, Budgets, Budgets

    Note: the budget section is now being maintained at the top of the page.

     

    The Problem with Task Forces:

    "State of the Profession: Shadow Governance" (Academe, March-April 2001)

    Concerns that must be addressed BEFORE we begin an online program:

    Faculty Rights and Responsibilities in Distance Learning (2000)

    2009: AAUP National's Report on Cedarville University

    Academic Freedom and Tenure: Cedarville University

    September 1, 2009: AAUP National's Report on Antioch College Released

    http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/newsroom/2009PRS/Antioch.htm

    July 30, 2009: Average US College Health Benefits

    http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/07/29/benefits

    July 29, 2009: Fired Edison Professor Reinstated

    http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/07/28/edison

    June 30, 2009: Antioch Reborn!

    See links at http://www.antiochians.org/s/1050/start.aspx

    June 16, 2009: A Good Idea from Wright State

    See pages 1 and 3 of this issue of the Wright AAUP's newsletter, The Right Flier, on the novel concept of a formal reporting system for (lack-of-)service issues in support of the primary academic mission. And if you think that state universities and privates live in separate worlds with nothing in common--read this recent issue for some good laughs of recognition; we are all in this together.

    June 12, 2009: An Article of Interest

    Adjunct pay of "$44,000 plus basic benefits" viewed as scandalously low at Stevens Institute of Technology, New Jersey. From Inside Higher Education: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/06/12/adjunct

    BULLETIN: May 12, 2009:

    It appears that our contracts include the expected "wiggle room" on the raise we thought we had negotiated. Regardless, the rest of the language is consistent with past contracts, and it does not seem necessary at this time to advise rejecting them.

    BULLETIN, May 8, 2009:

    The faculty at Georgetown, KY have been given contracts which specify a scale of pay reductions which faculty are to accept based on the number of students enrolled in the fall. Our best legal advice to date is that tenured faculty are NOT obligated to sign new contracts with this or any other modification. In the event that such language appears in our upcoming contracts, please be advised that we (the tenured faculty) may wish to collectively reject such provisions.

    Chapter News, April 20, 2009:

    TO OUR TENURED FACULTY: PLEASE WATCH THIS SPACE FOR NEWS AND LEGAL ADVICE REGARDING NEW CONTRACTS. IN THE EVENT OF UNEXPECTED CHANGES TO FACULTY CONTRACTS, SIGNING NEW CONTRACTS FOR THIS OR ANY YEAR MAY CONSTITUTE GIVING UP CONTRACTUAL RIGHTS.

    Chapter News, October 2, 2008:

    At the meeting of October 1, the chapter approved a pay and benefits proposal for 2009/10; this will be publicized by the end of the week.

    Chapter membership is now up to 21. Because main-campus full-time faculty currently number 57, we are optimistic that a membership drive may put us "over the top," and underline that we are advocating for the shared concerns of the majority. Letters and other recruiting materials will be distributed shortly.

    Membership will be polled as to the desirability of meeting on alternate Mondays at 4 p.m. for the current year; weekly meetings are seen as too frequent, but bi-weekly seems preferred by most.

    Mission

    The mission of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is to advance academic freedom, to define fundamental professional values and standards for higher education, and to ensure higher education's contribution to the common good. Founded in 1915, the AAUP has helped to shape American higher education by developing the standards and procedures that have maintained quality education and academic freedom in this country's colleges and universities for most of the twentieth century, and now in the beginning of the twenty-first century.

    The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is the only national organization exclusively serving the interests of college and university faculty members. AAUP supports and defends the principles of academic freedom and tenure and promotes policies to ensure academic due process. AAUP has more than 44,000 members at colleges and universities throughout the country.

    Ohio Chapters

    A "collective bargaining unit," or CBU, means the AAUP chapter is the sole recognized faculty representative organization for collective bargaining purposes. An "advocacy chapter" is one which advocates for AAUP-approved policies and standards in a non-CBU environment. Please also see the Ohio Conference of the AAUP (OCAAUP) site at ocaaup.org for updated listings of both advocacy and CBU chapters.

    Links of Interest

    Officers and Contact Information